Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Dig Liver Dis. 2012 Aug;44(8):636-42. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2012.02.013. Epub 2012 Apr 1.

Prevalence and clinical relevance of enteropathy associated with systemic autoimmune diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitari MútuaTerrassa, Fundació per la Recerca MútuaTerrassa, Universitat de Barcelona, Plaza Dr. Robert 5, Terrassa, Catalonia, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether systemic autoimmune diseases are a risk group for coeliac disease and if there is a systemic autoimmune diseases-associated enteropathy.

METHODS:

183 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases were included. Duodenal biopsy was carried out on patients with positive coeliac genetics (HLA-DQ2-DQ8) and/or serology and/or symptoms of the coeliac disease spectrum. When enteropathy was found, causes, including gluten sensitivity, were investigated and categorized according to a sequentially applied treatment. Results were analysed with Chi-square or Fisher exact tests.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of coeliac disease with atrophy was 0.55% (1 of 183 patients). Thirty-eight of the 109 patients (34.8%) who underwent duodenal biopsy had lymphocytic enteropathy (8 infectious, 5 due to gluten sensitive enteropathy, 5 HLA-DQ2/DQ8 who did not accept gluten-free diet and 20 of unknown aetiology). Lymphocytic enteropathy was unrelated to disease activity or immunosuppressants. HLA-DQ2 was more frequent in connective tissue disease (41.5%) compared with systemic vasculitis and autoinflammatory diseases (17.9%) (p=0.02), whereas a lower percentage of lymphocytic enteropathy was observed in the former (20.2% vs. 41.6%). Lymphocytic enteropathy was clinically irrelevant in cases with no definite aetiology.

DISCUSSION:

One third of systemic autoimmune diseases patients had enteropathy of uncertain clinical meaning in the majority of cases, which was rarely due to gluten sensitive enteropathy.

PMID:
22465228
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2012.02.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center