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Community Ment Health J. 2012 Aug;48(4):420-30. doi: 10.1007/s10597-012-9507-0. Epub 2012 Mar 30.

Consumer empowerment and self-advocacy outcomes in a randomized study of peer-led education.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL 60612, USA. pickett@psych.uic.edu

Abstract

This study examined the effectiveness of the Building Recovery of Individual Dreams and Goals (BRIDGES) peer-led education intervention in empowering mental health consumers to become better advocates for their own care. A total of 428 adults with mental illness were randomly assigned to BRIDGES (intervention condition) or a services as usual wait list (control condition). Interviews were conducted at enrollment, at the end of the intervention, and 6-months post-intervention. Random regression results indicate that, compared to controls, BRIDGES participants experienced significant increases in overall empowerment, empowerment-self-esteem, and self-advocacy-assertiveness, and maintained these improved outcomes over time. Peer-led education interventions may provide participants with the information, skills and support they need to become more actively involved in the treatment decision-making process.

PMID:
22460927
DOI:
10.1007/s10597-012-9507-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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