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Diabetologia. 2012 Jun;55(6):1824-35. doi: 10.1007/s00125-012-2530-4. Epub 2012 Mar 30.

α-Lipoic acid regulates lipid metabolism through induction of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

Author information

1
Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan.

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a longevity-associated protein, which regulates energy metabolism and lifespan in response to nutrient deprivation. It has been proposed to be a therapeutic target for obesity and metabolic syndrome. We investigated whether α-lipoic acid (ALA) exerts a lipid-lowering effect through regulation of SIRT1 activation and production in C(2)C(12) myotubes.

METHODS:

ALA-stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) production, as well as intracellular triacylglycerol accumulation and fatty acid β-oxidation were analysed in the absence or presence of a SIRT1 inhibitor (nicotinamide), SIRT1 small interfering (si) RNA and an AMPK inhibitor (compound C) in C(2)C(12) myotubes. Mice with streptozotocin/nicotinamide-induced diabetes and db/db mice fed on a high-fat diet were used to study the ALA-mediated lipid-lowering effects in vivo.

RESULTS:

ALA increased the NAD(+)/NADH ratio to enhance SIRT1 activity and production in C(2)C(12) myotubes. ALA subsequently increased AMPK and ACC phosphorylation, leading to increased palmitate β-oxidation and decreased intracellular triacylglycerol accumulation in C(2)C(12) myotubes. In cells treated with nicotinamide or transfected with SIRT1 siRNA, ALA-mediated AMPK/ACC phosphorylation, intracellular triacylglycerol accumulation and palmitate β-oxidation were reduced, suggesting that SIRT1 is an upstream regulator of AMPK. ALA increased ATGL and suppressed FAS protein production in C(2)C(12) myotubes. Oral administration of ALA in diabetic mice fed on a high-fat diet and db/db mice dramatically reduced the body weight and visceral fat content.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:

ALA activates both SIRT1 and AMPK, which leads to lipid-lowering effects in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that ALA may have beneficial effects in the treatment of dyslipidaemia and obesity.

PMID:
22456698
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-012-2530-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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