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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jun;97(6):2134-42. doi: 10.1210/jc.2011-3182. Epub 2012 Mar 28.

Treatment of vitamin D insufficiency in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease: a randomized clinical trial comparing three regimens.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USDA . Helen.pappa@childrens.harvard.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Vitamin D insufficiency [serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentration less than 20 ng/ml] is prevalent among children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and its treatment has not been studied.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of three vitamin D repletion regimens.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial from November 2007 to June 2010 at the Clinical and Translational Study Unit of Children's Hospital Boston. The study was not blinded to participants and investigators.

PATIENTS:

Eligibility criteria included diagnosis of IBD, age 5-21, and serum 25OHD concentration below 20 ng/ml. Seventy-one patients enrolled, 61 completed the trial, and two withdrew due to adverse events.

INTERVENTION:

Patients received orally for 6 wk: vitamin D(2), 2,000 IU daily (arm A, control); vitamin D(3), 2,000 IU daily (arm B); vitamin D(2), 50,000 IU weekly (arm C); and an age-appropriate calcium supplement.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

We measured the change in serum 25OHD concentration (Δ25OHD) (ng/ml). Secondary outcomes included change in serum intact PTH concentration (ΔPTH) (pg/ml) and the adverse event occurrence rate.

RESULTS:

After 6 wk, Δ25OHD ± se was: 9.3 ± 1.8 (arm A); 16.4 ± 2.0 (arm B); 25.4 ± 2.5 (arm C); P (A vs. C) = 0.0004; P (A vs. B) = 0.03. ΔPTH ± SE was -5.6 ± 5.5 (arm A); -0.1 ± 4.2 (arm B); -4.4 ± 3.9 (arm C); P = 0.57. No participant experienced hypercalcemia or hyperphosphatemia, and the prevalence of hypercalciuria did not differ among arms at follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

Oral doses of 2,000 IU vitamin D(3) daily and 50,000 IU vitamin D(2) weekly for 6 wk are superior to 2,000 IU vitamin D(2) daily for 6 wk in raising serum 25OHD concentration and are well-tolerated among children and adolescents with IBD. The change in serum PTH concentration did not differ among arms.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00621257.

PMID:
22456619
PMCID:
PMC3387426
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2011-3182
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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