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Amyloid. 2012 Jun;19(2):66-73. doi: 10.3109/13506129.2012.666508. Epub 2012 Mar 27.

New device technologies for subcutaneous fat biopsy.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Subcutaneous fat biopsy is useful for the evaluation of amyloidosis, environmental contaminants, lipid metabolism, genetic studies and diabetes research. The present study examined new technologies for fat biopsy.

METHODS:

Subcutaneous fat biopsy in 10 high-risk individuals was randomized to (i) a 10 ml reciprocating procedure device (RPD) mechanical syringe or (ii) a 60 ml vacuum syringe. Outcome measures included pain by the 10 cm Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS), adequacy of biopsied tissue, complications and diagnosis. The operator's ability to control syringes was quantitatively measured by the linear displacement method.

RESULTS:

Both syringes permitted facile aspiration of subcutaneous fat with adequate sample without complications. The mechanical and the vacuum syringes enhanced control of the needle compared to conventional syringes, reducing unintended forward penetration by 75% (3.6 ± 0.5 mm) and 87% (12.0 ± 1.4 mm), respectively (p < 0.0001). Free adipose cells were obtained in abundance as well as columnar biopsies containing intact blood vessels and connective tissue septa permitting precise microhistological examination. One case of primary AL amyloidosis (κ light chain disease) was diagnosed in each group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Subcutaneous fat biopsy by needle aspiration can be facilely achieved with new aspiration syringe technologies with improved needle control and enhanced patient safety.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00651625.

PMID:
22452536
PMCID:
PMC3638025
DOI:
10.3109/13506129.2012.666508
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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