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Neurochem Res. 2012 Jul;37(7):1560-7. doi: 10.1007/s11064-012-0751-z. Epub 2012 Mar 24.

Acacetin attenuates neuroinflammation via regulation the response to LPS stimuli in vitro and in vivo.

Author information

1
Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, East-West Integrated Medical Science Research Center, Kyung Hee University Global Campus, #1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do, 446-701, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Under normal conditions in the brain, microglia play roles in homeostasis regulation and defense against injury. However, over-activated microglia secrete proinflammatory and cytotoxic factors that can induce progressive brain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ischemia. Therefore, regulation of microglial activation contributes to the suppression of neuronal diseases via neuroinflammatory regulation. In this study, we investigated the effects of acacetin (5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone), which is derived from Robinia pseudoacacia, on neuroinflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells and in animal models of neuroinflammation and ischemia. Acacetin significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) and the expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. The compound also reduced proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, and inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. In an LPS-induced neuroinflammation mouse model, acacetin significantly suppressed microglial activation. Moreover, acacetin reduced neuronal cell death in an animal model of ischemia. These results suggest that acacetin may act as a potential therapeutic agent for brain diseases involving neuroinflammation.

PMID:
22447574
DOI:
10.1007/s11064-012-0751-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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