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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2012 Aug;97(2):251-7. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2012.02.019. Epub 2012 Mar 21.

Clinical implication of urinary tubular markers in the early stage of nephropathy with type 2 diabetic patients.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

AIM:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of urinary tubular markers, interleukin-18 (IL-18) and angiotensinogen with albuminuria in early nephropathy of type 2 diabetics.

METHODS:

Urine levels of tubular markers (kidney injury molecule [KIM]-1, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin [NGAL] and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein [L-FABP]), proinflammatory marker (IL-18), and a marker of intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) status (angiotensinogen) were determined in 118 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 25 non-diabetic controls with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2).

RESULTS:

Urinary levels of KIM-1, NGAL, IL-18 and angiotensinogen were significantly higher in macroalbuminuria group compared with control and normo- and microalbuminuria groups but not significantly different between control and normoalbuminuria group. Urinary tubular markers were positively correlated with urinary IL-18 and angiotensinogen, respectively. The urinary albuminuria was correlated with all investigated urinary markers in univariate analysis. After adjusting for several clinical parameters, urinary KIM-1, NGAL and angiotensinogen were significantly associated with albuminuria.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study suggest that urinary tubular markers may be independently associated with albuminuria in the early stage of nephropathy in type 2 diabetics (eGFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and may reflect inflammatory processing and the activation of the intrarenal RAS.

PMID:
22440044
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2012.02.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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