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Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Apr;119(4):845-51. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31824b2e3e.

Trends in the surgical management of stress urinary incontinence.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To estimate the rates of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) surgery from 2000 to 2009 by type of procedure, year, age, and region of the country.

METHODS:

We used data between 2000 and 2009 from a database containing health care claims data from employer-based plans in the United States. We analyzed data for all women age 18-64 years, identifying all SUI procedures in this population. Rates per 100,000 person-years and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated each year by procedure type, age, and region.

RESULTS:

The study population included 32.9 million women age 18-64 years observed for 74,007,937 person-years between 2000 and 2009. During that time, there were 182,110 SUI procedures for a rate of 246.1 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI 239.7-252.6). The most common SUI surgery was sling (198.3 per 100,000 person-years, 95% CI 192.8-203.9) followed by Burch (25.9 per 100,000 person-years, 95% CI 24.8-27.2). There was a dramatic increase in slings, with a corresponding decrease in Burch procedures from 2000 to 2009. Other SUI surgeries had lower rates. Although this trend was evident across all regions, the Northeast had the lowest rate of SUI surgery, whereas rates in the West, Midwest, and South were 1.44-times, 1.76-times, and 2.09-times higher, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

In a dramatic shift over the past decade, slings have become the dominant procedure for SUI among women age 18-64 years. Although this trend was seen across the United States, considerable variability exists in the SUI surgery rates by region.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

III.

PMID:
22433349
PMCID:
PMC3310349
DOI:
10.1097/AOG.0b013e31824b2e3e
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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