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J Biol Chem. 2012 May 18;287(21):17161-75. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M112.346759. Epub 2012 Mar 19.

Generation and nuclear translocation of sumoylated transmembrane fragment of cell adhesion molecule L1.

Author information

1
Zentrum für Molekulare Neurobiologie, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.

Abstract

The functions of the cell adhesion molecule L1 in the developing and adult nervous system are triggered by homophilic and heterophilic interactions that stimulate signal transductions that activate cellular responses. Here, we show that stimulation of signaling by function-triggering L1 antibodies or L1-Fc leads to serine protease-dependent cleavage of full-length L1 at the plasma membrane and generation of a sumoylated transmembrane 70-kDa fragment comprising the intracellular and transmembrane domains and part of the extracellular domain. The 70-kDa transmembrane fragment is transported from the plasma membrane to a late endosomal compartment, released from endosomal membranes into the cytoplasm, and transferred from there into the nucleus by a pathway that depends on importin and chromatin-modifying protein 1. Mutation of the sumoylation site at Lys(1172) or of the nuclear localization signal at Lys(1147) abolished L1-stimulated generation or nuclear import of the 70-kDa fragment, respectively. Nuclear import of the 70-kDa fragment may activate cellular responses in parallel or in association with phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways. Alterations in the levels of the 70-kDa fragment during development and in the adult after spinal cord injury or in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease suggest that this fragment is functionally implicated in development, regeneration, neurodegeneration, tumorigenesis, and possibly synaptic plasticity in the mature nervous system.

PMID:
22431726
PMCID:
PMC3366775
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M112.346759
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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