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Clin J Sport Med. 2012 May;22(3):249-53. doi: 10.1097/JSM.0b013e318249945b.

A temporal model for nonelite triathlon race injuries.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, St. Anthony Hospital, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, USA. terry-rimmer@ssmhc.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To (1) classify types and severity of injuries, (2) establish a temporal model for both the incidence and prevalence of injuries, and (3) identify the most appropriate medical manpower needed for nonelite triathlon competition.

DESIGN:

Prospective observational study.

SETTING:

Oklahoma City Redman Triathlon.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred four triathletes seeking medical care (575 race starters).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Prevalence and diagnoses of athletes seeking medical care, 15-minute injury incidence reports with severity classification, and duration of treatment.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of injuries sustained was 37.7% and 10.8% in the Ironman and half Ironman events, respectively. 72.2% of half Ironman injuries were sustained during hours 6 and 7, with a presentation rate of 78 per 1000 race starters during this time interval. The Ironman had a much higher rate of severe injuries at 38.2% ± 6.0% (95% confidence interval) and a longer average duration of treatment culminating in hour 14 at 62.3 minutes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Triathlon medical support should be modified to fit the temporal flow of injuries sustained throughout nonelite Ironman events. Previous studies have made recommendations from data collected from elite competitions that may not be ideal for nonelite races due to the higher rate of injuries, injury severity, and longer duration competition. Therefore, we recommend increasing support by 20% during the latter stages of triathlons, starting at hour 14, to 3 physicians and 9 nurses and other medical volunteers per 100 competitors. Further research into the implementation of these strategies should be performed before these data should be applied as common practice.

PMID:
22430328
DOI:
10.1097/JSM.0b013e318249945b
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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