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Ethn Dis. 2011 Autumn;21(4):495-501.

The impact of social communication on perceived HPV vaccine effectiveness in a low-income, minority population.

Author information

1
Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. acasillas@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Perceived vaccine effectiveness is linked to vaccine-uptake. This study aims to determine if hearing about the HPV vaccine from family/friends (social source) or discussing the vaccine with family/friends (social discussion) is associated with perceived HPV vaccine effectiveness among female ethnic-minority, medical-decision-makers of vaccine-eligible girls.

METHODS:

Data come from a cross-sectional HPV vaccine telephone-survey administered by the Los Angeles County Office of Women's Health (OWH) hotline operators between January-November 2009. Among survey participants who reported awareness of the HPV vaccine (n=294), two logistic regression models of perceived HPV vaccine effectiveness were conducted; a source of information model with social source as the main predictor, and a discussion model with social discussion as the main predictor. These were adjusted for medical source and medical discussion, and covariates affecting interaction with the health care system.

RESULTS:

Women who heard about the HPV vaccine from a social source were more likely to perceive the vaccine as effective compared to those who did not report a social source of information (adjusted OR 4.78, 95% CI 1.76-12.98). Medical source of information was also associated with perceived vaccine effectiveness (adjusted OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.06-4.05). Those who reported social discussion, but not those who discussed the vaccine with a medical provider, had increased odds of perceived vaccine effectiveness (adjusted OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.04-3.78).

CONCLUSIONS:

Social source of information and social discussion were associated with perceived HPV vaccine effectiveness; this highlights the value of social communication among low-income minority women, and the need for vaccine-messaging interventions that utilize a social network approach.(Ethn Dis. 2011;21(4):495-501)

PMID:
22428357
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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