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Nat Commun. 2012 Feb 28;3:704. doi: 10.1038/ncomms1713.

Three decades of high-resolution coastal sea surface temperatures reveal more than warming.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, 701 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. fplima@biol.sc.edu

Abstract

Understanding and forecasting current and future consequences of coastal warming require a fine-scale assessment of the near-shore temperature changes. Here we show that despite the fact that 71% of the world's coastlines are significantly warming, rates of change have been highly heterogeneous both spatially and seasonally. We demonstrate that 46% of the coastlines have experienced a significant decrease in the frequency of extremely cold events, while extremely hot days are becoming more common in 38% of the area. Also, we show that the onset of the warm season is significantly advancing earlier in the year in 36% of the temperate coastal regions. More importantly, it is now possible to analyse local patterns within the global context, which is useful for a broad array of scientific fields, policy makers and general public.

PMID:
22426225
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms1713
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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