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Science. 2012 Mar 16;335(6074):1351-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1215932.

Sexual deprivation increases ethanol intake in Drosophila.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143-2822, USA. shohatophirg@janelia.hhmi.org

Erratum in

  • Science. 2012 May 4;336(6081):541.
  • Science. 2012 Aug 17;337(6096):799. Mohammed, H [added].

Abstract

The brain's reward systems reinforce behaviors required for species survival, including sex, food consumption, and social interaction. Drugs of abuse co-opt these neural pathways, which can lead to addiction. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the relationship between natural and drug rewards. In males, mating increased, whereas sexual deprivation reduced, neuropeptide F (NPF) levels. Activation or inhibition of the NPF system in turn reduced or enhanced ethanol preference. These results thus link sexual experience, NPF system activity, and ethanol consumption. Artificial activation of NPF neurons was in itself rewarding and precluded the ability of ethanol to act as a reward. We propose that activity of the NPF-NPF receptor axis represents the state of the fly reward system and modifies behavior accordingly.

PMID:
22422983
PMCID:
PMC3909676
DOI:
10.1126/science.1215932
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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