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Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012 May;7(5):720-6. doi: 10.2215/CJN.06330611. Epub 2012 Mar 15.

Pedometer-assessed physical activity in children and young adults with CKD.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Nephrology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Data on physical activity are limited in children with CKD. The objectives of this study were to measure the level and correlates of physical activity in children and young adults with CKD and to determine the association of physical activity with physical performance and physical functioning.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS:

Physical activity was measured for 7 days using pedometers; physical performance was measured by the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) and physical functioning with the PedsQL 4.0.

RESULTS:

Study participants were 44 patients 7-20 years of age who had CKD stage 1-4 (n=12), had ESRD and were undergoing dialysis (n=7), or had undergone kidney transplantation (n=25). Participants were very sedentary; they walked 6218 (interquartile range, 3637, 9829) steps per day, considerably less than recommended. Physical activity did not differ among participants in the CKD stage 1-4, ESRD, and transplant groups. Females were less active than males (P<0.01), and physical activity was 44% lower among young adults (18-20 years) than younger participants (P<0.05). Physical activity was associated positively with maternal education and hemoglobin concentration and inversely with body mass index. Respective 6MWD in males and females was 2 and approximately 4 SDs below expected. Low levels of physical activity were associated with poor physical performance and physical functioning, after adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index.

CONCLUSIONS:

In most participants with CKD, physical activity was considerably below recommended levels. Future studies are needed to determine whether increasing physical activity can improve physical performance and physical functioning.

PMID:
22422539
PMCID:
PMC3338276
DOI:
10.2215/CJN.06330611
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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