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J Autism Dev Disord. 2012 Nov;42(11):2460-70. doi: 10.1007/s10803-012-1497-9.

Risk factors associated with self-injurious behaviors in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. emma.duerden@sickkids.ca

Abstract

While self-injurious behaviors (SIB) can cause significant morbidity for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), little is known about its associated risk factors. We assessed 7 factors that may influence self-injury in a large cohort of children with ASD: (a) atypical sensory processing; (b) impaired cognitive ability; (c) abnormal functional communication; (d) abnormal social functioning; (e) age; (f) the need for sameness; (g) rituals and compulsions. Half (52.3%, n = 126) of the children (n = 241, aged 2-19 years) demonstrated SIB. Abnormal sensory processing was the strongest single predictor of self-injury followed by sameness, impaired cognitive ability and social functioning. Since atypical sensory processing and sameness have a greater relative impact on SIB, treatment approaches that focus on these factors may be beneficial in reducing self-harm in children with ASD.

PMID:
22422338
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-012-1497-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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