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Behav Brain Res. 2012 May 16;231(1):1-10. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2012.02.049. Epub 2012 Mar 5.

Scopolamine induced memory impairment; possible involvement of NMDA receptor mechanisms of dorsal hippocampus and/or septum.

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1
Department of Biology, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM:

The anatomical connections of septum and hippocampus and the influence of cholinergic and glutamatergic projections in these sites have been reported. In the present study, the effect of pre-training intra-dorsal hippocampal (CA1) and intra-medial septal (MS) administration of scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine antagonist, and NMDA receptor agents and their interactions, on acquisition of memory have been investigated.

METHODS:

The animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the CA1 regions and in the medial septum. Animals were trained in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task, and tested 24h after training to measure step-through latency as memory retrieval.

RESULTS:

Intra-CA1 or intra-MS injections of scopolamine (0.5, 1 and 2 μg/rat) and D-AP7 (a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist; 0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 μg/rat) reduced, while NMDA (0.125 and 0.25 μg/rat) increased memory. Intra-MS injection of a subthreshold dose of NMDA reduced scopolamine induced amnesia in the MS. However, similar injection of NMDA into CA1 did not alter scopolamine response when injected into CA1. Moreover, intra-MS or -CA1 injection of a subthreshold dose of NMDA did not alter scopolamine response in the CA1 or MS respectively. On the other hand, co-administration subthreshold doses of D-AP7 and scopolamine into CA1 and/or MS induced amnesia.

CONCLUSIONS:

The cholinergic system between septum and CA1 are modulating memory acquisition processes induced by glutamatergic system in the CA1 or septum and co-activation of these systems in these sites can influence learning and memory.

PMID:
22421366
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbr.2012.02.049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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