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J Am Coll Health. 2012;60(3):194-202. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2011.586388.

Use of and interest in smoking cessation strategies among daily and nondaily college student smokers.

Author information

1
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. cjberg@emory.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine use of and interest in cessation strategies among nondaily and daily college student smokers.

PARTICIPANTS:

800 undergraduate student smokers aged 18 to 25.

METHODS:

The authors examined nondaily versus daily smoking in relation to use of and interest in cessation strategies using an online survey.

RESULTS:

Nondaily (65.8%) versus daily smokers (34.3%) were more likely to have made a quit attempt (p = .01) but less likely to have used any assistance (p < .001). Nondaily smokers were less interested in pharmacotherapy and traditional behavioral interventions; however, there was no difference in interest in technology-based interventions among nondaily versus daily smokers. Controlling for covariates, there were no significant differences in interest in traditional or technology-based behavioral interventions. Higher motivation, lower confidence, and depressive symptomatology were related to interest in each intervention. Smoking for social reasons was related to interest in technology-based interventions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Different intervention strategies may be appropriate for nondaily and daily smokers.

PMID:
22420696
PMCID:
PMC4521395
DOI:
10.1080/07448481.2011.586388
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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