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J Neurointerv Surg. 2013 May;5(3):191-5. doi: 10.1136/neurintsurg-2011-010198. Epub 2012 Mar 13.

Angioarchitectural features associated with hemorrhagic presentation in pediatric cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

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1
Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

To date, there have been few published studies examining the relationship between arteriovenous malformation (AVM) angioarchitecture and hemorrhagic presentation among children with cerebral AVMs. This study examines this relationship in this unique population, in whom symptomatic presentation of cerebral AVM is the norm rather than the exception.

METHODS:

A cohort of children with AVMs from 2000 to 2011 were included. Predictors studied included patient age, gender and angioarchitectural features, including AVM location, nidus size and morphology, venous drainage, presence of venous outflow lesions and associated aneurysms. Predictors of hemorrhagic presentation were assessed using multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS:

135 children (70 males, mean age 10.1 years) were included. 86/135 (63.7%) children presented with hemorrhage, 18 (13.3%) with seizures, 17 (12.6%) with headaches or neurological deficits and 14 (10.4%) were asymptomatic. AVM location, morphology and the presence of associated aneurysm, venous ectasia, draining vein stenosis and single draining vein were not significantly associated factors. After multivariate analysis, AVM size (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.77; p<0.01), exclusive deep venous drainage (OR 4.94, 95% CI 1.30 to 18.8; p=0.02) and infratentorial location (OR 9.94, 95% CI 1.71 to 51.76; p=0.01) were independently associated with hemorrhagic presentation.

CONCLUSION:

Smaller AVM size, exclusive deep venous drainage and infratentorial location are specific angioarchitectural factors independently associated with initial hemorrhagic presentation in children with AVMs.

PMID:
22416111
DOI:
10.1136/neurintsurg-2011-010198
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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