Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Public Health. 2012 Jun;57(3):619-27. doi: 10.1007/s00038-012-0356-y. Epub 2012 Mar 14.

Do social relations explain health inequalities? Evidence from a longitudinal survey in a changing eastern German region.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Sociology and Health Economics, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. j.klein@uke.uni-hamburg.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study explores the contribution of social relations to explain inequalities in self-rated health in a changing north-eastern German region. So far, there are only few studies that analysed the mediating effects of social relations in a longitudinal design.

METHODS:

We used data from the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP) consisting of 3,300 randomly selected men and women at baseline (2001), and at the 5-year follow-up (2006). Indicators of social inequality were education, equivalent household income and occupational status. Social relations were estimated by the Social Integration Index (SII) and the perceived instrumental and emotional support. Self-rated general health was assessed at both waves of data collection.

RESULTS:

Depending on the indicators used, social relations explain up to 35% of the inequalities in self-rated health. Changes in odds ratios are slightly more pronounced when education and income are used as inequality indicator and when adjusting for the SII.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall findings suggest that social relations are an important explanatory factor for health inequalities in a deprived German region.

PMID:
22415373
DOI:
10.1007/s00038-012-0356-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Support Center