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Pharmacology. 2012;89(3-4):149-55. doi: 10.1159/000336871. Epub 2012 Mar 12.

Topical and systemic cannabidiol improves trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid colitis in mice.

Author information

1
Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Compounds of Cannabis sativa are known to exert anti-inflammatory properties, some of them without inducing psychotropic side effects. Cannabidiol (CBD) is such a side effect-free phytocannabinoid that improves chemically induced colitis in rodents when given intraperitoneally. Here, we tested the possibility whether rectal and oral application of CBD would also ameliorate colonic inflammation, as these routes of application may represent a more appropriate way for delivering drugs in human colitis.

METHODS:

Colitis was induced in CD1 mice by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Individual groups were either treated with CBD intraperitoneally (10 mg/kg), orally (20 mg/kg) or intrarectally (20 mg/kg). Colitis was evaluated by macroscopic scoring, histopathology and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay.

RESULTS:

Intraperitoneal treatment of mice with CBD led to improvement of colonic inflammation. Intrarectal treatment with CBD also led to a significant improvement of disease parameters and to a decrease in MPO activity while oral treatment, using the same dose as per rectum, had no ameliorating effect on colitis.

CONCLUSION:

The data of this study indicate that in addition to intraperitoneal application, intrarectal delivery of cannabinoids may represent a useful therapeutic administration route for the treatment of colonic inflammation.

PMID:
22414698
PMCID:
PMC3668621
DOI:
10.1159/000336871
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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