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Expert Opin Ther Targets. 2012 Apr;16(4):365-76. doi: 10.1517/14728222.2012.668887. Epub 2012 Mar 13.

Targeting angiogenesis for the treatment of prostate cancer.

Author information

1
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Prostate Cancer Research Program, Baltimore, MD 21231-1000, USA. eantona1@jhmi.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

While multiple therapies exist that prolong the lives of men with advanced prostate cancer, none are curative. This had led to a search to uncover novel targets for prostate cancer therapy, distinct from those of traditional hormonal approaches, chemotherapies, immunotherapies and bone-targeting approaches. The process of tumor angiogenesis is one target that is being exploited for therapeutic gain.

AREAS COVERED:

The most promising anti-angiogenic approaches for treatment of prostate cancer, focusing on clinical development of selected agents. These include VEGF-directed therapies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, tumor-vascular disrupting agents, immunomodulatory drugs and miscellaneous anti-angiogenic agents. While none of these drugs have yet entered the market for the treatment of prostate cancer, several are now being tested in Phase III registrational trials.

EXPERT OPINION:

The development of anti-angiogenic agents for prostate cancer has met with several challenges. This includes discordance between traditional prostate-specific antigen responses and clinical responses, which have clouded clinical trial design and interpretation, potential inadequate exposure to anti-angiogenic therapies with premature discontinuation of study drugs and the development of resistance to anti-angiogenic monotherapies. These barriers will hopefully be overcome with the advent of more potent agents, the use of dual angiogenesis inhibition and the design of more informative clinical trials.

PMID:
22413953
PMCID:
PMC4005337
DOI:
10.1517/14728222.2012.668887
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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