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J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2012 Oct;55(5):1373-86. doi: 10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0358). Epub 2012 Mar 12.

The effect of technology and testing environment on speech perception using telehealth with cochlear implant recipients.

Author information

1
Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE, USA. jenny.goehring@boystown.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In this study, the authors evaluated the effect of remote system and acoustic environment on speech perception via telehealth with cochlear implant recipients.

METHOD:

Speech perception was measured in quiet and in noise. Systems evaluated were Polycom visual concert (PVC) and a hybrid presentation system (HPS). Each system was evaluated in a sound-treated booth and in a quiet office.

RESULTS:

For speech in quiet, there was a significant effect of environment, with better performance in the sound-treated booth than in the office; there was no effect of system (PVC or HPS). Speech in noise revealed a significant interaction between environment and system. Subjects' performance was poorer for PVC in the office, whereas performance in the sound-treated booth was not significantly different for the two systems. Results from the current study were compared to results for the same group of subjects from an earlier study; these results suggested that poorer performance at remote sites in the previous study was primarily due to environment, not system.

CONCLUSIONS:

Speech perception was best when evaluated in a sound-treated booth. HPS was superior for speech in noise in a reverberant environment. Future research should focus on modifications to non-sound-treated environments for telehealth service delivery in rural areas.

PMID:
22411283
PMCID:
PMC3474600
DOI:
10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0358)
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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