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J Clin Invest. 2012 Apr;122(4):1487-502. doi: 10.1172/JCI58092. Epub 2012 Mar 12.

EBNA3B-deficient EBV promotes B cell lymphomagenesis in humanized mice and is found in human tumors.

Author information

1
Section of Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) persistently infects more than 90% of the human population and is etiologically linked to several B cell malignancies, including Burkitt lymphoma (BL), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), and diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Despite its growth transforming properties, most immune-competent individuals control EBV infection throughout their lives. EBV encodes various oncogenes, and of the 6 latency-associated EBV-encoded nuclear antigens, only EBNA3B is completely dispensable for B cell transformation in vitro. Here, we report that infection with EBV lacking EBNA3B leads to aggressive, immune-evading monomorphic DLBCL-like tumors in NOD/SCID/γc-/- mice with reconstituted human immune system components. Infection with EBNA3B-knockout EBV (EBNA3BKO) induced expansion of EBV-specific T cells that failed to infiltrate the tumors. EBNA3BKO-infected B cells expanded more rapidly and secreted less T cell-chemoattractant CXCL10, reducing T cell recruitment in vitro and T cell-mediated killing in vivo. B cell lines from 2 EBV-positive human lymphomas encoding truncated EBNA3B exhibited gene expression profiles and phenotypic characteristics similar to those of tumor-derived lines from the humanized mice, including reduced CXCL10 secretion. Screening EBV-positive DLBCL, HL, and BL human samples identified additional EBNA3B mutations. Thus, EBNA3B is a virus-encoded tumor suppressor whose inactivation promotes immune evasion and virus-driven lymphomagenesis.

PMID:
22406538
PMCID:
PMC3314448
DOI:
10.1172/JCI58092
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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