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J Invest Dermatol. 2012 Jun;132(6):1645-55. doi: 10.1038/jid.2012.34. Epub 2012 Mar 8.

Langerhans cells from human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma induce strong type 1 immunity.

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1
Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York , USA.

Abstract

Langerhans cells (LCs) are dendritic cells (DCs) localized to the epidermis. They should be the first antigen-presenting cells to encounter squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of LCs isolated from human SCC to induce T-cell proliferation and polarization. We investigated the ability of LCs from SCC and peritumoral skin to induce T-cell proliferation and polarization. We also studied the effect of SCC supernatant on the ability of LCs from normal skin, in vitro-generated LCs, and DCs to activate and polarize T cells. LCs from SCC were stronger inducers of allogeneic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production than LCs from peritumoral skin. We found that tumor supernatants (TSNs) were rich in immunosuppressive cytokines; despite this, allogeneic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ induction by LCs were augmented by TSN. Moreover, TSN facilitated IFN-γ induction by in vitro-generated LCs, but suppressed the ability of in vitro-generated DCs to expand allogeneic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. We have demonstrated that LCs from SCC can induce type 1 immunity. TSN induces IFN-γ induction by in vitro-generated LCs. This contrasts greatly with prior studies showing that DCs from SCC cannot stimulate T cells. These data indicate that LCs may be superior to DCs for SCC immunotherapy and may provide a new rationale for harnessing LCs for the treatment of cancer patients.

PMID:
22402444
PMCID:
PMC3677713
DOI:
10.1038/jid.2012.34
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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