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J Cardiol. 2012 Jul;60(1):61-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jjcc.2012.01.012. Epub 2012 Mar 7.

Arrhythmia and sleep-disordered breathing in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. unosaw@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recently, the role of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in cardiovascular disease has attracted attention. In this study, we investigated the influence of SDB on postoperative arrhythmias after cardiac surgery.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

In 89 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, postoperative portable monitoring for SDB and Holter electrocardiography were performed. The primary end-points were the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and occurrence of arrhythmia. The secondary end-points were: (1) patient background factors; (2) average heart rate; (3) maximum heart rate (total, daytime, and nighttime); (4) minimum heart rate (total, daytime, and nighttime); (5) minimum SaO(2) during sleep; and (6) an independent predictor for arrhythmia. Twenty-six patients (29.2%) had an AHI≥15 and they were classified into the SDB group, while patients with an AHI<15 formed the non-SDB group (70.8%). Although there was no significant difference in atrial fibrillation, frequent nocturnal premature ventricular contractions were significantly more common in the SDB group (19.2%) than the non-SDB group (3.2%) (p=0.01). Maximum daytime and nighttime heart rates were also significantly higher in the SDB group. AHI was a significant predictor for frequent nocturnal premature ventricular contractions.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study showed that SDB is common among patients undergoing cardiac surgery, and that SDB might be closely associated with arrhythmia in these patients.

PMID:
22402419
DOI:
10.1016/j.jjcc.2012.01.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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