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Scand J Rheumatol. 2012 May;41(3):165-9. doi: 10.3109/03009742.2012.654815. Epub 2012 Mar 9.

Apolipoprotein-defined lipoprotein abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis patients and their potential impact on cardiovascular disease.

Author information

1
Department of Arthritis and Clinical Rheumatology, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA. nknowlton@nskstat.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to explore apolipoprotein-defined lipoproteins for abnormalities when comparing non-rheumatological controls to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients.

METHODS:

Apolipoprotein and lipoprotein profiles were measured on 94 RA patients and 79 controls by immunoturbidimetric procedures, electroimmunoassays, and immunoprecipitation. Differences between means were tested with a two-sided Student t test with Satterthwaite adjustment. p-values were adjusted for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni procedure.

RESULTS:

RA patients had significantly higher levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) than controls, but no significant differences in the levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-C. RA patients had significantly lower levels of apolipoprotein (apo)A-I and lipoprotein (Lp)A-I:A-II, but no difference in levels of LpA-I than normal controls. There was a significant difference in the levels of LpB:C but not in LpB:C:E between RA patients and controls. The main abnormality among apoB lipoproteins was the significantly increased concentration of the LpA-II:B:C:D:E subclass in RA patients in comparison with controls. The high levels of LpA-II:B:C:D:E are also reflected in significantly increased levels of apoC-III, and apoC-III bound to apoB lipoproteins.

CONCLUSION:

The LpA-II:B:C:D:E subclass has potential as a new marker for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in RA patients.

PMID:
22401593
DOI:
10.3109/03009742.2012.654815
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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