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Gerontologist. 2012 Aug;52(4):506-16. doi: 10.1093/geront/gnr161. Epub 2012 Mar 7.

Intentions to quit work among care staff working in the aged care sector.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia. gery.karantzas@deakin.edu.au

Abstract

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY:

The aged care industry experiences high rates of staff turnover. Staff turnover has significant implications for the quality of care provided to care recipients and the financial costs to care agencies. In this study, we applied a model of intention to quit to identify the contextual and personal factors that shape aged care staff's intention to quit.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

A sample of 208 aged care staff, including nurses, personal care assistants, allied health professionals, and managers completed a self-report questionnaire. The questionnaire assessed intention to quit, organizational commitment, job satisfaction, self-esteem, stressors, stress, and supervisor support.

RESULTS:

The findings largely supported the model. Specifically, job commitment, job satisfaction, and work stressors directly influenced intentions to quit, although work stressors and supervisor support demonstrated numerous indirect associations on quitting intentions.

IMPLICATIONS:

The findings suggest that aged care service providers can modify aged care workers' intentions to quit by reducing job stressors and increasing supervisor support.

PMID:
22399580
DOI:
10.1093/geront/gnr161
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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