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Am J Kidney Dis. 1990 Nov;16(5):438-46.

Body fluid spaces and blood pressure in hemodialysis patients during amelioration of anemia with erythropoietin.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN 55415.

Abstract

Blood pressure (BP) may increase in hemodialysis patients during treatment of anemia with recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO). Since fluid volume is a determinant of BP in dialysis patients, changes in body fluid spaces during r-HuEPO therapy could affect BP. Thus, 51Cr-labeled red blood cell (RBC) volume, inulin extracellular fluid (ECF) volume, and urea total body water (TBW), as well as cardiac output, plasma renin activity (PRA), and plasma aldosterone concentration were determined postdialysis before and after r-HuEPO therapy in patients in whom changes in BP could be managed by ultrafiltration alone. Eleven patients entered the study: one had a renal transplant and two required addition of antihypertensive drug therapy and were excluded; eight, of whom two required antihypertensive drug therapy following the study, were included in the analyses. Results revealed an increase in predialysis hemoglobin from 67 to 113 g/L (6.7 to 11.3 g/dL) (P = 0.001) during 18 +/- 6 weeks of therapy. Predialysis diastolic BP increased from 80 to 85 mm Hg (P = 0.07), while postdialysis diastolic BP was unchanged at 73 mm Hg. 51Cr-RBC volume increased, from 0.7 to 1.3 L (P = 0.004). ECF tended to decrease, from 13.7 to 10.8 L (P = 0.064), while TBW decreased to a similar extent, but not significantly, 34.3 to 31.2 L (P = 0.16). Postdialysis ECF volume was positively correlated with mean arterial BP at baseline (r = 0.89, P = 0.007) and after therapy (r = 0.74, P = 0.035). However, the regression lines for this relationship were different (P = 0.022) before and after therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
2239934
DOI:
10.1016/s0272-6386(12)80056-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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