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Vet J. 2012 Aug;193(2):514-21. doi: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2012.01.034. Epub 2012 Mar 6.

Use of comparative proteomics to identify the effects of creatine pyruvate on lipid and protein metabolism in broiler chickens.

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1
Key Laboratory of Animal Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, PR China.

Abstract

Four hundred male chickens were selected to study the effects of pyruvate (Pyr), creatine pyruvate (CrPyr) and creatine (Cr) on the expression of hepatic mitochondrial and cytoplasm proteins associated with lipid and protein metabolism. Mitochondrial purification was accomplished using the two-step differential centrifugation and density gradient method, and the activities of organelle-specific marker enzymes were determined to assess the purity of the mitochondria. Proteins were extracted and fractionated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the differential protein spots were assessed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. CrPyr reduced fatty acid accumulation by down-regulating adipose differentiation-related protein, inhibited ATP synthase expression, and reduced cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) expression, thus reducing the levels of high density lipoprotein and triglycerol (TG) levels (thereby lowering fat and cholesterol deposition). CrPyr increased the expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 2B, calreticulin (CRT) and eIF3a, thus promoting protein synthesis. CrPyr up-regulated the expression of fatty acid-binding proteins, CETP and apolipoprotein A-IV in cytoplasmic extracts, and these proteins accelerated the decomposition of fatty acids and TG, thus reducing fat deposition. In conclusion, CrPyr plays an important role in lipolysis and protein synthesis, and this effect was more pronounced than was the effect of Pyr and Cr.

PMID:
22398130
DOI:
10.1016/j.tvjl.2012.01.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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