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J Phys Act Health. 2013 Feb;10(2):151-9. Epub 2012 Feb 29.

Water tubing-related injuries treated in US emergency departments, 1991-2009.

Author information

1
Center for Injury Research and Policy Department, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The objective was to describe the patterns and mechanisms of water tubing-related injuries treated in U.S. emergency departments.

METHODS:

The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was used to examine cases of water tubing-related injuries. Sample weights were used to calculate national estimates of water tubing-related injuries. Analyses were conducted in 2010.

RESULTS:

From 1991-2009 an estimated 69,471 injuries were treated in US emergency departments for water tubing-related injuries. The annual number of cases increased 250% over the 19-year study period (P < .001). Sprains and strains accounted for the largest portion of injuries (27.2%). The head was the most frequently injured body part (27.5%). Children and adolescents ≤ 19 years were more likely to be injured by contact with another person (OR: 2.47; 95% CI = 1.61-3.80) and were more likely to sustain injuries to the head (OR: 2.61; 95% CI = 2.01-3.38) compared with adults. Adults ≥ 20 years, were more likely than individuals ≤ 19 years to sustain sprains and strains (OR: 2.11; 95% CI = 1.64-2.71) and were most commonly injured by impact with the water (54.6%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patterns of water tubing-related injuries differ for children and adults. Research is needed to determine how best to reduce these injuries.

PMID:
22394544
DOI:
10.1123/jpah.10.2.151
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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