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J Clin Med Res. 2011 Dec;3(6):279-84. doi: 10.4021/jocmr697w. Epub 2011 Nov 10.

Short-term effects of high-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure in patients with cystic fibrosis.

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1
Cystic Fibrosis Unit, Departmet of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Parma, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cystic fibrosis patients require daily airway clearance therapies. The primary objective of this study was to compare the short-term efficacy of high-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask on expectorated sputum, pulmonary function, and oxygen saturation in patients with CF hospitalized for an acute pulmonary exacerbation.

METHODS:

A controlled randomized cross-over trial with 24 hours between treatments was used. Thirty-four CF patients (26 ± 6.5 years) were included in the study. Before and 30 minutes after each treatment were recorded: pulmonary function testing, oxygen saturation, and perceived dyspnea. Preference for the two devices was assessed.

RESULTS:

No statistically significant difference between high-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask was found in sputum production and in lung function testing. A reduction in SpO(2) was found after positive expiratory pressure mask (98 ± 1.0% versus 97 ± 1.2%; P < 0.001). Both treatments induced a statistically significant increase in Borg scale for dyspnea without differences between them. Patients reported greater satisfaction with positive expiratory pressure mask than with high-frequency chest compression (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

High-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask have comparable short-term effects on expectorated sputum and lung function. Although positive expiratory pressure mask was associated with a lower SpO(2), it was better tolerated than high-frequency chest compression.

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