Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31546. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0031546. Epub 2012 Feb 27.

Cognitive control reflects context monitoring, not motoric stopping, in response inhibition.

Author information

1
Department of Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States of America. chathach@gmail.com

Abstract

The inhibition of unwanted behaviors is considered an effortful and controlled ability. However, inhibition also requires the detection of contexts indicating that old behaviors may be inappropriate--in other words, inhibition requires the ability to monitor context in the service of goals, which we refer to as context-monitoring. Using behavioral, neuroimaging, electrophysiological and computational approaches, we tested whether motoric stopping per se is the cognitively-controlled process supporting response inhibition, or whether context-monitoring may fill this role. Our results demonstrate that inhibition does not require control mechanisms beyond those involved in context-monitoring, and that such control mechanisms are the same regardless of stopping demands. These results challenge dominant accounts of inhibitory control, which posit that motoric stopping is the cognitively-controlled process of response inhibition, and clarify emerging debates on the frontal substrates of response inhibition by replacing the centrality of controlled mechanisms for motoric stopping with context-monitoring.

PMID:
22384038
PMCID:
PMC3288048
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0031546
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center