Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Occup Environ Med. 2012 Jun;69(6):422-7. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2011-100268. Epub 2012 Mar 1.

Association between long-term exposure to traffic particles and blood pressure in the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Particulate air pollution is associated with cardiovascular events, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. The main objective was to assess the relationship between long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and blood pressure (BP).

METHODS:

The authors used longitudinal data from 853 elderly men participating in the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study, followed during 1996-2008. Long-term average exposures to traffic particles were created from daily predictions of black carbon (BC) exposure at the geocoded address of each subject, using a validated spatiotemporal model based on ambient monitoring at 82 Boston-area locations. The authors examined the association of these exposures with BP using a mixed model. The authors included the following covariates: age, body mass index, smoking, alcohol, fasting glucose, creatinine clearance, use of cardiovascular medication, education, census-level poverty, day of week and season of clinical visit.

RESULTS:

The authors found significant positive associations between 1-year average BC exposure and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. An IQR increase in 1-year average BC exposure (0.32 μg/m(3)) was associated with a 2.64 mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure (95% CI 1.47 to 3.80) and a 2.41 mm Hg increase in diastolic blood pressure (95% CI 1.77 to 3.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Long-term exposure to traffic particles is associated with increased BP, which may explain part of the association with myocardial infarctions and cardiovascular deaths reported in cohort studies.

PMID:
22383587
PMCID:
PMC3597742
DOI:
10.1136/oemed-2011-100268
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center