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Mult Scler. 2012 Oct;18(10):1472-9. Epub 2012 Mar 1.

Effect of gender on late-onset multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We aimed to examine the incidence and disease course of late-onset multiple sclerosis (LOMS) compared with adult-onset MS (AOMS) in our clinic cohort, stratified based on gender and race, since both have been reported as important modifiers of disease outcomes in MS.

METHODS:

Patients with LOMS and AOMS were compared in terms of demographic characteristics and disease course characteristics. Combined effects were investigated with a logistic regression model. Time from disease onset to sustained Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score of 6 was investigated using an extension of log-rank test appropriate for interval-censored data.

RESULTS:

Some 7.96% of 4273 patients studied had an onset of MS after the age of 50 years (LOMS), and 1.33% experienced an onset after age 60. Progressive onset was more common in LOMS relative to AOMS. The proportion of women with progressive-onset disease was similar in AOMS and LOMS. Time to EDSS 6 was delayed in AOMS females compared with males; however, it was similar between males and females in the LOMS group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Women with LOMS have a different trajectory in terms of disease progression than women with AOMS. The effect of menopause combined with race/ethnicity on the MS disease course requires further investigation.

PMID:
22383227
DOI:
10.1177/1352458512438236
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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