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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Mar;206(3):199.e1-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2012.01.001.

Childhood lead poisoning prevention through prenatal housing inspection and remediation in St. Louis, MO.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Family Care Health Centers, Saint Louis, MO, USA. dberg@fchcstl.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We assessed the screening and remediation of home lead hazards prenatally in a high-risk population, hypothesizing that average blood-lead level and the number of poisonings would drop by 25%.

STUDY DESIGN:

One hundred fifty-two women underwent prenatal home inspections by certified lead inspectors. The hazards that were identified were remediated. The blood-lead levels of children of participating women were compared with matched control subjects.

RESULTS:

Blood-lead levels were obtained from 60 children and compared with matched control subjects. The average blood-lead level of children in the treatment group was 2.70 μg/dL vs 3.73 μg/dL in control subjects (P = .019). The percentage of children with levels >10 μg/dL in the treatment group was 0% vs 4.2% in control subjects (P = .128).

CONCLUSION:

Screening and remediation of houses of pregnant women is effective to reduce the average blood-lead level and number of children that exceed the federal level of concern for lead poisoning in a high-risk population.

PMID:
22381600
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2012.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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