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Neurourol Urodyn. 2012 Apr;31(4):470-4. doi: 10.1002/nau.22235. Epub 2012 Feb 29.

Predictors of care seeking in women with urinary incontinence.

Author information

1
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. vminassian@partners.org

Abstract

AIMS:

To determine predictors of health care utilization in women with urinary incontinence (UI) from the population to specialty care.

METHODS:

The General Longitudinal Overactive Bladder Evaluation-UI is a population-based study on the natural history of UI in women ≥40 years of age. Prevalence of UI was estimated using the Bladder Health Survey (BHS). Survey data were linked with electronic health records (EHRs) to examine factors associated with a clinical UI diagnosis using logistic regression. Risk factors analyzed included: UI symptoms, subtypes, bother, severity, duration, and effect on quality of life, and demographic and other health characteristics. All statistical tests were two-sided with a P-value < 0.05 being significant.

RESULTS:

The overall prevalence of any UI based on responses to the BHS was 1,618/4,064 (40%). Of the 1,618 women with UI, there were only 398 (25%) women with EHR (clinical) diagnosis of UI. Women with UI versus those without UI were more likely to be have a BMI >25 kg/m(2) (70% vs. 58%), more likely to be parous (91% vs. 87%) and college educated (54% vs. 46%), P < 0.001. After adjusting for confounders in the model, variables significantly associated with clinical UI diagnosis included: older age (OR = 1.96), higher parity (> 1 birth) (OR = 1.76), higher urgency UI (OR = 1.08), adaptive behavior (OR = 1.2), and UI bother scores (OR = 1.01), as well as more frequent outpatient visits (OR = 1.03), P < 0.05.

CONCLUSIONS:

UI is a highly prevalent condition with only a minority of women seeking care. Factors associated with health care utilization include older age, parity (1+), number of doctor visits, urgency UI subtype, UI bother, and impact on behavior.

PMID:
22378605
PMCID:
PMC3348577
DOI:
10.1002/nau.22235
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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