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Int J Sports Med. 2012 May;33(5):359-63. doi: 10.1055/s-0031-1297999. Epub 2012 Feb 29.

Effect of hyperoxic-supplemented interval training on endurance performance in trained cyclists.

Author information

1
Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. andrew.kilding@aut.ac.nz

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of hyperoxic-supplemented interval training on endurance performance. Using a single-blind, randomised control-trial design, 16 well-trained cyclists were randomly assigned to either hyperoxic or normoxic training. Participants visited the laboratory twice per week, for 4 weeks, to perform high-intensity interval training sessions. A 20 km TT, incremental exercise test and 60s all-out test were conducted pre- and post-intervention. Smaller effects for most physiological measures, including VO 2peak (1.9 ± 4.3%) and lactate threshold (0.3 ± 8.3%), were observed after training in hyperoxia compared to normoxia. There was a small increase in mean power during the 20 km TT after hyperoxia [2.1 ± 3.7%; effect size (ES): - 0.30 ± 0.39] but this was less than that observed after normoxia (4.9 ± 3.9%; ES: - 0.44 ± 0.60). During the 60 s all-out test, the peak relative power was relatively unchanged, whereas mean relative power was increased in normoxia (2.3 ± 3.4%) but not hyperoxia (0.3 ± 1.2%; ES: - 0.34 ± 0.49). Hyperoxic-supplemented interval training in the competitive season had less effect on endurance and high-intensity performance and physiology in trained endurance cyclists compared to interval training in normoxia. Therefore hyperoxic-supplemented training at sea level appears to be not worthwhile for maximising performance in competitive endurance athletes.

PMID:
22377939
DOI:
10.1055/s-0031-1297999
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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