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Front Neurol Neurosci. 2012;30:4-8. doi: 10.1159/000333373. Epub 2012 Feb 14.

Sensory syndromes.

Author information

1
Hans Berger Department of Neurology, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany.

Abstract

Somatosensory deficit syndromes represent a common impairment following stroke and have a prevalence rate of around 80% in stroke survivors. These deficits restrict the ability of survivors to explore and manipulate their environment and are generally associated with a negative impact on quality of life and personal safety. Sensory impairments affect different sensory modalities in diverse locations at varying degrees, ranging from complete hemianesthesia of multiple modalities to dissociated impairment of somatosensory submodalities within a particular region of the body. Sensory impairments induce typical syndromal patterns which can be differentiated by means of a careful neurological examination, allowing the investigator to deduce location and size of the underlying stroke. In particular, a stroke located in the brainstem, thalamus, and the corticoparietal cortex result in well-differentiable sensory syndromes. Sensory function following stroke can be regained during rehabilitation even without specific sensory training. However, there is emerging evidence that specialized sensory interventions can result in improvement of somatosensory and motor function. Herein, we summarize the clinical presentations, examination, differential diagnoses, and therapy of sensory syndromes in stroke.

PMID:
22377851
DOI:
10.1159/000333373
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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