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MAbs. 2012 Mar-Apr;4(2):267-73. doi: 10.4161/mabs.4.2.19364. Epub 2012 Mar 1.

Influence of improved FcRn binding on the subcutaneous bioavailability of monoclonal antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys.

Author information

1
Eli Lilly Research Laboratories; Eli Lilly Corporate Center; Indianapolis, IN USA; Departments of Drug Disposition Development/Commercialization; Eli Lilly Research Laboratories; Eli Lilly Corporate Center; Indianapolis, IN USA.
2
Eli Lilly Research Laboratories; Eli Lilly Corporate Center; Indianapolis, IN USA; Biotechnology Discovery Research; Eli Lilly Research Laboratories; Eli Lilly Corporate Center; Indianapolis, IN USA.

Abstract

Engineering monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with improved binding to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is a strategy that can extend their in vivo half-life and slow their systemic clearance. Published reports have predominantly characterized the pharmacokinetics of mAbs after intravenous administration. Recently, studies in mice suggest FcRn may also play a role in affecting the subcutaneous bioavailability of mAbs. Herein, we examined whether five mAbs engineered with the T250Q/M428L Fc mutations that improved their FcRn interactions, and subsequently their in vivo pharmacokinetics after intravenous administration, had improved subcutaneous bioavailability compared with their wild-type counterparts in cynomolgus monkeys. Similar to the intravenous administration findings, the pharmacokinetic profiles of our variant mAbs after subcutaneous injection showed improved half-life or clearance. In contrast, a clear effect was not observed on the subcutaneous bioavailability. We expect that while FcRn may play a role in determining mAb subcutaneous bioavailability, multiple biopharmaceutical and physiological factors are likely to influence the success of engineering strategies aimed at targeting this pathway for improving bioavailability.

PMID:
22377715
PMCID:
PMC3361662
DOI:
10.4161/mabs.4.2.19364
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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