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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Mar;93(3):466-70. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2011.08.047.

The use of pedometers in stroke survivors: are they feasible and how well do they detect steps?

Author information

1
Department of Clinical and Surgical Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Scotland. scarrol1@staffmail.ed.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine (1) the feasibility of pedometers for stroke patients and (2) the level of agreement between pedometers and actual step count.

DESIGN:

Observational agreement study.

SETTING:

Six stroke units.

PARTICIPANTS:

Independently mobile stroke patients (N=50) ready for hospital discharge.

INTERVENTIONS:

Patients were asked to apply 3 pedometers: 1 around the neck and 1 above each hip. Patients performed a short walk lasting 20 seconds, then a 6-minute walk test 6MWT. Video recordings determined the criterion standard step count.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Agreement between the step count recorded by pedometers and the step count recorded by viewing the criterion standard video recordings of the 2 walks.

RESULTS:

Five patients (10%) needed assistance to put on the pedometers, and 5 (10%) could not read the step count. Thirty-nine (78%) would use pedometers again. Below a gait speed of about 0.5 m/s, pedometers did not generally detect steps. Agreement analyses showed that even above 0.5 m/s, pedometers undercounted steps for both the short walk and 6MWT; for example, the mean difference between the video recorder and pedometer around the neck was 5.93 steps during the short walk and 32.4 steps during the 6MWT.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pedometers are feasible but generally do not detect steps at gait speeds below about 0.5 m/s, and they undercount steps at gait speeds above 0.5 m/s.

PMID:
22373934
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2011.08.047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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