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Aging Ment Health. 2012;16(5):592-602. doi: 10.1080/13607863.2011.644518. Epub 2012 Feb 28.

Psychometric properties of a structured interview guide for the rating for anxiety in dementia.

Author information

  • 1Center for Mental Health and Aging, Department of Psychology and University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA. LSNOW@as.ua.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The Rating Anxiety in Dementia (RAID; Shankar, K.K., Walker, M., Frost, D., & Orrell, M.W. (1999). The development of a valid and reliable scale for rating anxiety in dementia (RAID). Aging and Mental Health, 3, 39-49.) is a clinical rating scale developed to evaluate anxiety in persons with dementia. This report explores the psychometric properties and clinical utility of a new structured interview format of the RAID (RAID-SI), developed to standardize administration and scoring based on information obtained from the patient, an identified collateral, and rater observation.

METHOD:

The RAID-SI was administered by trained master's level raters. Participants were 32 persons with dementia who qualified for an anxiety treatment outcome study. Self-report anxiety, depression, and quality of life measures were administered to both the person with dementia and a collateral.

RESULTS:

The RAID-SI exhibited adequate internal consistency reliability and inter-rater reliability. There was also some evidence of construct validity as indicated by significant correlations with other measures of patient-reported and collateral-reported anxiety, and non-significant correlations with collateral reports of patient depression and quality of life. Further, RAID-SI scores were significantly higher in persons with an anxiety diagnosis compared to those without an anxiety diagnosis.

CONCLUSION:

There is evidence that the RAID-SI exhibits good reliability and validity in older adults with dementia. The advantage of the structured interview format is increased standardization in administration and scoring, which may be particularly important when RAID raters are not experienced clinicians.

PMID:
22372475
PMCID:
PMC3371288
DOI:
10.1080/13607863.2011.644518
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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