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Acta Psychol (Amst). 2012 Mar;139(3):524-31. doi: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2012.01.013. Epub 2012 Feb 26.

The interaction between duration, velocity and repetitive auditory stimulation.

Author information

1
School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, United Kingdom. alexis.makin@liverpool.ac.uk

Abstract

Repetitive auditory stimulation (with click trains) and visual velocity signals both have intriguing effects on the subjective passage of time. Previous studies have established that prior presentation of auditory clicks increases the subjective duration of subsequent sensory input, and that faster moving stimuli are also judged to have been presented for longer (the time dilation effect). However, the effect of clicks on velocity estimation is unknown, and the nature of the time dilation effect remains ambiguous. Here were present a series of five experiments to explore these phenomena in more detail. Participants viewed a rightward moving grating which traveled at velocities ranging from 5 to 15°/s and which lasted for durations of 500 to 1500 ms. Gratings were preceded by clicks, silence or white noise. It was found that both clicks and higher velocities increased subjective duration. It was also found that the time dilation effect was a constant proportion of stimulus duration. This implies that faster velocity increases the rate of the pacemaker component of the internal clock. Conversely, clicks increased subjective velocity, but the magnitude of this effect was not proportional to actual velocity. Through considerations of these results, we conclude that clicks independently affect velocity and duration representations.

PMID:
22370503
DOI:
10.1016/j.actpsy.2012.01.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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