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Nat Genet. 2012 Feb 26;44(4):440-4, S1-2. doi: 10.1038/ng.1091.

De novo mutations in the actin genes ACTB and ACTG1 cause Baraitser-Winter syndrome.

Author information

1
Center for Integrative Brain Research, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Abstract

Brain malformations are individually rare but collectively common causes of developmental disabilities. Many forms of malformation occur sporadically and are associated with reduced reproductive fitness, pointing to a causative role for de novo mutations. Here, we report a study of Baraitser-Winter syndrome, a well-defined disorder characterized by distinct craniofacial features, ocular colobomata and neuronal migration defect. Using whole-exome sequencing of three proband-parent trios, we identified de novo missense changes in the cytoplasmic actin-encoding genes ACTB and ACTG1 in one and two probands, respectively. Sequencing of both genes in 15 additional affected individuals identified disease-causing mutations in all probands, including two recurrent de novo alterations (ACTB, encoding p.Arg196His, and ACTG1, encoding p.Ser155Phe). Our results confirm that trio-based exome sequencing is a powerful approach to discover genes causing sporadic developmental disorders, emphasize the overlapping roles of cytoplasmic actin proteins in development and suggest that Baraitser-Winter syndrome is the predominant phenotype associated with mutation of these two genes.

PMID:
22366783
PMCID:
PMC3677859
DOI:
10.1038/ng.1091
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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