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J Strength Cond Res. 2013 Jan;27(1):181-7. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31824f23ad.

Effect of grip width on electromyographic activity during the upright row.

Author information

1
Exercise Neuromechanics Laboratory, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA.

Abstract

The upright row (URR) is commonly used to develop the deltoid and upper back musculature. However, little information exists concerning muscle recruitment during variations of this exercise. Sixteen weight-trained men completed 2 repetitions each in the URR with 3 grip conditions: 50, 100, and 200% of the biacromial breadth (BAB). The load was the same for all grip conditions and was equal to 85% of the 1RM determined at 100% BAB. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to compare the maximal activity of the anterior deltoid (AD), lateral deltoid (LD), posterior deltoid (PD), upper trapezius (UT), middle trapezius (MT), and biceps brachii (BB) during the 3 grip widths for eccentric and concentric actions. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were noted in concentric muscle activity for LD (p < 0.001) and PD (p < 0.001), and in eccentric muscle activity for AD (p = 0.023), LD (p < 0.001), UT (p < 0.001), MT (p < 0.001), and BB (p = 0.003). Bonferroni post hoc analysis revealed significant pairwise differences in the concentric actions from the LD (50% vs. 200% BAB and 100% vs. 200% BAB) and PD (50% vs. 200% BAB and 100% vs. 200% BAB), and eccentric actions of the LD (all comparisons), UT (all comparisons), MT (50% vs. 200% BAB and 100% vs. 200% BAB), and BB (50% vs. 200% BAB), with large-to-very-large effect sizes (ESs). Moderate-to-large ESs were noted for several nonsignificant comparisons. The main findings of this investigation are increased deltoid and trapezius activity with increasing grip width, and correspondingly less BB activity. Therefore, those who seek to maximize involvement of the deltoid and trapezius muscles during the URR should use a wide grip.

PMID:
22362088
DOI:
10.1519/JSC.0b013e31824f23ad
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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