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Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2012 Jun 1;83(2):e223-30. doi: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2011.12.051. Epub 2012 Feb 21.

Phase II study to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

Author information

1
Departments of Neurosurgery and CyberKnife, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Cavernous sinus hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor. The direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage. Although radiosurgery plays an important role in managing cavernous sinus hemangiomas as a treatment alternative to microsurgery, the potential for increased toxicity with single-session treatment of large tumors is a concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

METHODS:

Fourteen patients with large (volume >20 cm(3)) cavernous sinus hemangiomas were enrolled in a prospective Phase II study between December 2007 and December 2010. The hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy dose was 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions.

RESULTS:

After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 6-36 months), the magnetic resonance images showed a mean of 77% tumor volume reduction (range, 44-99%). Among the 6 patients with cranial nerve impairments before hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 achieved symptomatic complete resolution and 5 had improvement. No radiotherapy-related complications were observed during follow-up.

CONCLUSION:

Our current experience, though preliminary, substantiates the role of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Although a longer and more extensive follow-up is needed, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions is effective in reducing the tumor volume without causing any new deficits and can be considered as a treatment modality for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

PMID:
22361080
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijrobp.2011.12.051
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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