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Hypertens Res. 2012 Jul;35(7):739-44. doi: 10.1038/hr.2012.23. Epub 2012 Feb 23.

Physical activity modifies the association between CYBA gene polymorphisms and small artery elasticity in a Chinese population.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.

Abstract

Emerging evidence suggests that increased superoxide production is responsible for a significant proportion of endothelial dysfunction. The relationship between variants of the CYBA gene and cardiovascular diseases is currently debated. In the present study, we investigated the influence of CYBA polymorphisms (rs1049255 and rs7195830) on arterial elasticity in a Chinese population. In the 2178 participants enrolled in the GaoYou study, we measured large artery elasticity (C1) and small artery elasticity (C2) non-invasively, genotyped the CYBA polymorphisms and calculated energy expenditure. The AA genotype of the rs1049255 polymorphism was associated with a lower C2 than were the GG/AG genotypes (5.31±0.11 vs. 5.52±0.06 ml mm Hg(-1) × 100; P=0.01). Further analyses revealed an interaction between CYBA polymorphisms and physical activity with respect to C2 (P=0.007 for rs1049255 and P=0.038 for rs7195830). In less physically active participants, the AA genotype of the rs1049255 polymorphism was associated with a significantly lower C2 than the GG/AG genotypes (4.69±0.16 vs. 5.26±0.19 ml mm Hg(-1) × 100; P=0.008). In physically active participants, the GG/AG genotypes of rs7195830 polymorphism were correlated with higher C2 values than the AA genotype (5.84±0.08 vs. 5.08±0.32 ml mm Hg(-1) × 100; P=0.049). Haplotype analyses revealed higher C2 values in rs1049255G-rs7195830G carriers (P=0.0015). In conclusion, the rs1049255 and rs7195830 polymorphisms of the CYBA gene were associated with C2 in a Chinese population; physical activity could modify this genetic effect.

PMID:
22357521
DOI:
10.1038/hr.2012.23
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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