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Anaesthesia. 2012 Jun;67(6):626-31. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2044.2012.07087.x. Epub 2012 Feb 21.

Measurement of forces applied during Macintosh direct laryngoscopy compared with GlideScope® videolaryngoscopy.

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1
Department of Anesthesia, Toronto General Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. twainrussell@gmail.com

Abstract

Laryngoscopy can induce stress responses that may be harmful in susceptible patients. We directly measured the force applied to the base of the tongue as a surrogate for the stress response. Force measurements were obtained using three FlexiForce Sensors(®) (Tekscan Inc, Boston, MA, USA) attached along the concave surface of each laryngoscope blade. Twenty-four 24 adult patients of ASA physical status 1-2 were studied. After induction of anaesthesia and neuromuscular blockade, laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation was performed using either a Macintosh or a GlideScope(®) (Verathon, Bothell, WA, USA) laryngoscope. Complete data were available for 23 patients. Compared with the Macintosh, we observed lower median (IQR [range]) peak force (9 (5-13 [3-25]) N vs 20 (14-28 [4-41]) N; p = 0.0001), average force (5 (3-7 [2-19]) N vs 11 (6-16 [1-24]) N; p = 0.0003) and impulse force (98 (42-151 [26-444]) Ns vs 150 (93-207 [17-509]) Ns; p = 0.017) with the GlideScope. Our study shows that the peak lifting force on the base of the tongue during laryngoscopy is less with the GlideScope videolaryngoscope compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope.

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