Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Can J Infect Dis. 1998 Jul;9(4):209-14.

Seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus, Toxoplasma gondii, syphilis, and hepatitis B and C virus infections in a regional population seropositive for HIV infection.

Author information

1
Southern Alberta HIV Clinic, Calgary, Alberta;

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of exposure to cytomegalovirus (CMV), Toxoplasma gondii, syphilis, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a large, well characterized, regional population presenting for human immunodeficency virus (HIV) care.

DESIGN:

Demographic and serological data compiled prospectively in a relational database used for routine patient care. Results were analyzed for statistically significant trends within demographic subpopulations known to be at risk of such infections.

PATIENTS AND SETTING:

A total of 1274 persons with documented HIV infection in southern Alberta have sought medical care since 1985. Serological status to CMV, T gondii, syphilis, HBV and HCV infections were routinely requested as part of the initial assessment. All patients with serological results available were included in the analysis.

RESULTS:

CMV infection was found in 84.1% of patients. A lower prevalence of CMV infection in those under 30 yeasr old (P<0.001), intravenous drug users (IVDUs) (P=0.001) and in patients with transfusion-acquired HIV (P<0.001) was seen. T gondii seropositivity was found in 10.6% of patients, with an increased risk of seropositivity in those born outside of Canada (P<0.001). Syphilis seropositivity was present in 5.1% of patients, with a higher prevalence in gay males (P=0.1). HBV carrier status was noted in 8.0% of patients, with males having an increased risk (P=0.025). Since 1990, there has been a 17.6% prevalence of HCV, predominantly in IVDUs (P<0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Seroprevalence to common pathogens in HIV disease varies significantly among subpopulations, necessitating individual testing.

KEYWORDS:

Education; Epidemiology; Opportunistic infections; Prevention; Risk factors

PMID:
22346544
PMCID:
PMC3250888

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center