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J Surg Res. 2012 Aug;176(2):503-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2011.11.1027. Epub 2011 Dec 15.

Bromelain ameliorates the wound microenvironment and improves the healing of firearm wounds.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In a previous study, we proposed a new therapy using topical bromelain as a supplement to simple wound-track incision for the debridement of firearm wounds. This enzymatic debridement greatly simplified the management of high-velocity gunshot wounds in a pig model, and bromelain was confirmed to improve wound healing. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of bromelain on the microenvironment of firearm wounds.

METHODS:

Sixteen Chinese landrace pigs wounded by high-velocity projectiles were divided randomly into four groups: wound incision (group I), incision + bromelain (group IB), wound excision (group E), and control. Blood perfusion, oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)), and the content of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in wound-track tissue were measured. Wound healing was also noted.

RESULTS:

The recovery of blood perfusion in tissue and pO(2) in wound tracks was significantly more rapid in group IB and group E than in group I and control. The tissue level of TNF-α was significantly lower in group IB than in group I and control 48 h and 72 h post-wounding, and was lower than in group E 48 h post-wounding. The tissue level of TGF-β in group IB was sustained at a significantly higher level than in the other three groups. Wound healing time was also shorter in group IB.

CONCLUSIONS:

Enzymatic debridement using topical bromelain in incised wound tracks accelerates the recovery of blood perfusion, pO(2) in wound tissue, controls the expression of TNF-α and raises the expression of TGF-β.

PMID:
22341346
DOI:
10.1016/j.jss.2011.11.1027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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