Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2012 Jun;25(6):699-705. doi: 10.3109/14767058.2011.596593. Epub 2012 Feb 18.

Trends and risk factors of stillbirth in New Jersey 1997-2005.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08903, USA. faizas@umdnj.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The purpose of this study was to examine the trends in the rates of stillbirth by race and ethnicity and to determine the risk factors of stillbirth.

METHODS:

We used New Jersey data (1997-2005) for live births and fetal deaths. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the risk of stillbirth associated with maternal risk factors and pregnancy complications.

RESULTS:

The rate of stillbirth was 4.4/1000 total births (3.4 for white and 7.9 for black non-Hispanics and 4.4 for Hispanics/1000 total births). The rates of stillbirth decreased from 3.8 in 1997 to 2.7/1000 total births in 2005 for white non-Hispanics but remained unchanged for other race/ethnicity groups. Adjusted relative risks for the risk factors associated with stillbirth were 1.3 (95% CI, 1.2-1.4) for maternal age ≥ 35 years, 1.9 (95% CI, 1.7-2.1) for black non-Hispanics, 2.8 (95% CI, 2.4-3.3) for no prenatal care, 40.2 (95% CI, 36.9-43.9) for placental abruption, 5.3 (95% CI, 3.4-8.2) for eclampsia, 3.5 (95% CI, 2.8-4.3) for diabetes mellitus and 1.7 (95% CI, 1.3-2.2) for preeclampsia.

CONCLUSION:

There was a decline in the rate of stillbirth but there were persistent racial disparities with the highest rates of stillbirth for black non-Hispanics.

PMID:
22339200
DOI:
10.3109/14767058.2011.596593
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Taylor & Francis
    Loading ...
    Support Center